FAQ

How can illicit trafficking and misuse of nuclear materials be prevented?

Answer

Risks addressed by countries are theft of nuclear materials, including those used in nuclear weapons as well as theft of other radioactive materials, sabotage against nuclear materials and facilities. The IAEA tracks nuclear or other radioactive material outside of proper protection and control: a network of 110 States voluntarily contributes information to the Illicit Trafficking Database.  A globally accepted international framework for nuclear security is essential.

Background

Risks addressed by countries are theft of nuclear materials, including those used in nuclear weapons as well as theft of other radioactive materials and sabotage against nuclear materials and facilities. The IAEA assists States to prevent illegal access to plutonium or high-enriched uranium for use in any type of nuclear explosive device and is working to protect people, property and the environment against malicious use of nuclear or other radioactive material.
For improving nuclear security, prevention is the first line of defense and  includes upgrading the protection of nuclear facilities, storage and transport. If such protection fails, countries need effective border control with user friendly equipment at border crossings, training customs officials and efficient cooperation between law enforcement officials.
The IAEA tracks nuclear or other radioactive material outside of proper protection and control: a network of 110 States voluntarily contributes information to the Illicit Trafficking Database.
A globally accepted international framework for nuclear security is essential
 
Reference: IAEA Brochure on Nuclear Security
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